Quote 14 Oct 66,215 notes
For years, I opened my 11th-grade U.S. history classes by asking students, “What’s the name of that guy they say discovered America?” A few students might object to the word “discover,” but they all knew the fellow I was talking about. “Christopher Columbus!” several called out in unison.

“Right. So who did he find when he came here?” I asked. Usually, a few students would say, “Indians,” but I asked them to be specific: “Which nationality? What are their names?”

Silence.

In more than 30 years of teaching U.S. history and guest-teaching in others’ classes, I’ve never had a single student say, “Taínos.” How do we explain that? We all know the name of the man who came here from Europe, but none of us knows the name of the people who were here first—and there were hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of them. Why haven’t you heard of them?

This ignorance is an artifact of historical silencing—rendering invisible the lives and stories of entire peoples.

[…] In an interview with Barbara Miner, included in Rethinking Columbus, Suzan Shown Harjo of the Morning Star Institute, who is Creek and Cheyenne, said: “As Native American peoples in this red quarter of Mother Earth, we have no reason to celebrate an invasion that caused the demise of so many of our people, and is still causing destruction today.” After all, Columbus did not merely “discover,” he took over. He kidnapped Taínos, enslaved them—“Let us in the name of the Holy Trinity go on sending all the slaves that can be sold,” Columbus wrote—and “punished” them by ordering that their hands be cut off or that they be chased down by vicious attack dogs, if they failed to deliver the quota of gold that Columbus demanded. One eyewitness accompanying Columbus wrote that it “did them great damage, for a dog is the equal of 10 men against the Indians.”

Corporate textbooks and children’s biographies of Columbus included none of this and were filled with misinformation and distortion. But the deeper problem was the subtext of the Columbus story: it’s OK for big nations to bully small nations, for white people to dominate people of color, to celebrate the colonialists with no attention paid to the perspectives of the colonized, to view history solely from the standpoint of the winners.
— 

Bill Bigelow, Rethinking Columbus: Towards a True People’s History (via professorpinka)

The context of these words is even more chilling:

This past January, almost exactly 20 years after its publication, Tucson schools banned the book I co-edited with Bob Peterson, Rethinking Columbus. It was one of a number of books adopted by Tucson’s celebrated Mexican American Studies program—a program long targeted by conservative Arizona politicians.Textbook depictions of Columbus are often filled with misinformation and distortion or are justified with references to manifest destiny. The bottom image is a woodcut by Theodor De Bry, in the 16th century, based on the writings of Bartolome de las Casas. (Photo collage: Zinn Education Project)

image

The school district sought to crush the Mexican American Studies program; our book itself was not the target, it just got caught in the crushing. Nonetheless, Tucson’s—and Arizona’s—attack on Mexican American Studies and Rethinking Columbus shares a common root: the attempt to silence stories that unsettle today’s unequal power arrangements.

the attempt to silence stories that unsettle today’s unequal power arrangements.
the attempt to silence stories that unsettle today’s unequal power arrangements.
the attempt to silence stories that unsettle today’s unequal power arrangements.

(via medievalpoc)

Was just teaching my 7 year old stepdaughter about Columbus and his brutal enslavement of the Taínos last week. We have to educate our children, they won’t do it for us.

(via maniata76)

Let’s advocate for an Indigenous day, instead of a Bartolomé day or whatever grossly offensive, white colonizer-centric thing that comic going around recently was advocating for. You don’t get to talk about the genocides in the Americas and finish with attempting to “deify” another white colonizer. Ugh. Disgusting.

I’ve already expressed my personal bitterness and hatred for how this particular topic is handled in general by STEM & history lovers in general, particularly on tumblr, via my own personal blog.

If you’re dressing up as Columbus to be “cute” on your popular science blog, I’m going to question deeply why you admire and want to emulate a genocidal pedophile.

Or, in other words, learn your g-d damn history, honor the land you live on and who it actually belongs to, and stop idolizing murderous racists… is it really that hard?

(via scinerds)

(Source: fariyah)

Photo 3 Mar 185,284 notes korraful:

Date a girl who writes.
Date a girl who may never wear completely clean clothes, because of coffee stains and ink spills. She’ll have many problems with her closet space, and her laptop is never boring because there are so many words, so many worlds that she’s cluttered amidst the space. Tabs open filled with obscure and popular music. Interesting factoids about Catherine the Great, and the immortality of jellyfish. Laugh it off when she tells you that she forgot to clean her room, that her clothes are lost among the binders so it’ll take her longer to get ready, that her shoes hidden under the mountain of broken Bic pens and the refurbished laptop that she’s saved for ever since she was twelve. 
Kiss her under the lamppost, when it’s raining. Tell her your definition of love. 
Find a girl who writes. You’ll know that she has a sense of humor, a sense of empathy and kindness, and that she will dream up worlds, universes for you. She’s the one with the faintest of shadows underneath her eyelids, the one who smells of coffee and Coca-cola and jasmine green tea. You see that girl hunched over a notebook. That’s the writer. With her fingers occasionally smudged with charcoal, with ink that will travel onto your hands when you interlock your fingers with her’s. She will never stop, churning out adventures, of traitors and heroes. Darkness and light. Fear and love. That’s the writer. She can never resist filling a blank page with words, whatever the color of the page is.
She’s the girl reading while waiting for her coffee and tea. She’s the quiet girl with her music turned up loud (or impossibly quiet), separating the two of you by an ocean of crescendos and decrescendos as she’s thinking of the perfect words. If you take a peek at her cup, the tea or coffee’s already cold. She’s already forgotten it.
Use a pick-up line with her if she doesn’t look to busy.
If she raises her head, offer to buy her another cup of coffee. Or of tea. She’ll repay you with stories. If she closes her laptop, give her your critique of Tolstoy, and your best theories of Hannibal and the Crossing. Tell her your characters, your dreams, and ask if she gotten through her first novel. 
It is hard to date a girl who writes. But be patient with her. Give her books for her birthday, pretty notebooks for Christmas and for anniversaries, moleskins and bookmarks and many, many books. Give her the gift of words, for writers are talkative people, and they are verbose in their thanks. Let her know that you’re behind her every step of the way, for the lines between fiction and reality are fluid.
She’ll give you a chance.
Don’t lie to her. She’ll understand the syntax behind your words. She’ll be disappointed by your lies, but a girl who writes will understand. She’ll understand that sometimes even the greatest heroes fail, and that happy endings take time, both in fiction and reality. She’s realistic. A girl who writes isn’t impatient; she will understand your flaws. She will cherish them, because a girl who writes will understand plot. She’ll understand that endings happen for better or for worst.
A girl who writes will not expect perfection from you. Her narratives are rich, her characters are multifaceted because of interesting flaws. She’ll understand that a good book does not have perfect characters; villains and tragic flaws are the salt of books. She’ll understand trouble, because it spices up her story. No author wants an invincible hero; the girl who writes will understand that you are only human.
Be her compatriot, be her darling, her love, her dream, her world.
If you find a girl who writes, keep her close. If you find her at two AM, typing furiously, the neon gaze of the light illuminating her furrowed forehead, place a blanket gently on her so that she does not catch a chill. Make her a pot of tea, and sit with her. You may lose her to her world for a few moments, but she will come back to you, brimming with treasure. You will believe in her every single time, the two of you illuminated only by the computer screen, but invincible in the darkness.
She is your Shahrazad. When you are afraid of the dark, she will guide you, her words turning into lanterns, turning into lights and stars and candles that will guide you through your darkest times. She’ll be the one to save you.
She’ll whisk you away on a hot air balloon, and you will be smitten with her. She’s mischievous, frisky, yet she’s quiet and when she has to kill off a lovely character, when she cries, hold her and tell her that it will be alright. 
You will propose to her. Maybe on a boat in the ocean, maybe in a little cottage in the Appalachian Mountains. Maybe in New York City. Maybe Chicago. Baltimore. Maybe outside her publisher’s office. Because she’s radiant, wherever she goes. Maybe even outside of a cinema where the two of you kiss in the rain. She’ll say that it is overused and clichéd, but the glint in her eyes will tell you that she appreciates it all the same.
You will smile hard as she talks a mile a second, and your heart will skip a beat when she holds your hand and she will write stories of your lives together. She’ll hold you close and whisper secrets into your ears. She’s lovely, remember that. She’s self made and she’s brilliant. Her names for the children might be terrible, but you’ll be okay with that. A girl who writes will tell your children fantastical stories.
Because that is the best part about a girl who writes. She has imagination and she has courage, and it will be enough. She’ll save you in the oceans of her dreams, and she’ll be your catharsis and your 11:11. She’ll be your firebird and she’ll be your knight, and she’ll become your world, in the curve of her smile, in the hazel of her eye the half-dimple on her face, the words that are pouring out of her, a torrent, a wave, a crescendo - so many sensations that you will be left breathless by a girl who writes.
Maybe she’s not the best at grammar, but that is okay.
Date a girl who writes because you deserve it. She’s witty, she’s empathetic, enigmatic at times and she’s lovely. She’s got the most colorful life. She may be living in NYC or she may be living in a small cottage. Date a girl who writes because a girl who writes reads. 
A girl who writes will understand reality. She’ll be infuriating at times, and maybe sometimes you will hate her. Sometimes she will hate you too. But a girl who writes understands human nature, and she will understand that you are weak. She will not leave on the Midnight Train the first moment that things go sour. She will understand that real life isn’t like a story, because while she works in stories, she lives in reality. 
Date a girl who writes. 
Because there is nothing better than a girl who writes.

korraful:

Date a girl who writes.

Date a girl who may never wear completely clean clothes, because of coffee stains and ink spills. She’ll have many problems with her closet space, and her laptop is never boring because there are so many words, so many worlds that she’s cluttered amidst the space. Tabs open filled with obscure and popular music. Interesting factoids about Catherine the Great, and the immortality of jellyfish. Laugh it off when she tells you that she forgot to clean her room, that her clothes are lost among the binders so it’ll take her longer to get ready, that her shoes hidden under the mountain of broken Bic pens and the refurbished laptop that she’s saved for ever since she was twelve.

Kiss her under the lamppost, when it’s raining. Tell her your definition of love.

Find a girl who writes. You’ll know that she has a sense of humor, a sense of empathy and kindness, and that she will dream up worlds, universes for you. She’s the one with the faintest of shadows underneath her eyelids, the one who smells of coffee and Coca-cola and jasmine green tea. You see that girl hunched over a notebook. That’s the writer. With her fingers occasionally smudged with charcoal, with ink that will travel onto your hands when you interlock your fingers with her’s. She will never stop, churning out adventures, of traitors and heroes. Darkness and light. Fear and love. That’s the writer. She can never resist filling a blank page with words, whatever the color of the page is.

She’s the girl reading while waiting for her coffee and tea. She’s the quiet girl with her music turned up loud (or impossibly quiet), separating the two of you by an ocean of crescendos and decrescendos as she’s thinking of the perfect words. If you take a peek at her cup, the tea or coffee’s already cold. She’s already forgotten it.

Use a pick-up line with her if she doesn’t look to busy.

If she raises her head, offer to buy her another cup of coffee. Or of tea. She’ll repay you with stories. If she closes her laptop, give her your critique of Tolstoy, and your best theories of Hannibal and the Crossing. Tell her your characters, your dreams, and ask if she gotten through her first novel.

It is hard to date a girl who writes. But be patient with her. Give her books for her birthday, pretty notebooks for Christmas and for anniversaries, moleskins and bookmarks and many, many books. Give her the gift of words, for writers are talkative people, and they are verbose in their thanks. Let her know that you’re behind her every step of the way, for the lines between fiction and reality are fluid.

She’ll give you a chance.

Don’t lie to her. She’ll understand the syntax behind your words. She’ll be disappointed by your lies, but a girl who writes will understand. She’ll understand that sometimes even the greatest heroes fail, and that happy endings take time, both in fiction and reality. She’s realistic. A girl who writes isn’t impatient; she will understand your flaws. She will cherish them, because a girl who writes will understand plot. She’ll understand that endings happen for better or for worst.

A girl who writes will not expect perfection from you. Her narratives are rich, her characters are multifaceted because of interesting flaws. She’ll understand that a good book does not have perfect characters; villains and tragic flaws are the salt of books. She’ll understand trouble, because it spices up her story. No author wants an invincible hero; the girl who writes will understand that you are only human.

Be her compatriot, be her darling, her love, her dream, her world.

If you find a girl who writes, keep her close. If you find her at two AM, typing furiously, the neon gaze of the light illuminating her furrowed forehead, place a blanket gently on her so that she does not catch a chill. Make her a pot of tea, and sit with her. You may lose her to her world for a few moments, but she will come back to you, brimming with treasure. You will believe in her every single time, the two of you illuminated only by the computer screen, but invincible in the darkness.

She is your Shahrazad. When you are afraid of the dark, she will guide you, her words turning into lanterns, turning into lights and stars and candles that will guide you through your darkest times. She’ll be the one to save you.

She’ll whisk you away on a hot air balloon, and you will be smitten with her. She’s mischievous, frisky, yet she’s quiet and when she has to kill off a lovely character, when she cries, hold her and tell her that it will be alright.

You will propose to her. Maybe on a boat in the ocean, maybe in a little cottage in the Appalachian Mountains. Maybe in New York City. Maybe Chicago. Baltimore. Maybe outside her publisher’s office. Because she’s radiant, wherever she goes. Maybe even outside of a cinema where the two of you kiss in the rain. She’ll say that it is overused and clichéd, but the glint in her eyes will tell you that she appreciates it all the same.

You will smile hard as she talks a mile a second, and your heart will skip a beat when she holds your hand and she will write stories of your lives together. She’ll hold you close and whisper secrets into your ears. She’s lovely, remember that. She’s self made and she’s brilliant. Her names for the children might be terrible, but you’ll be okay with that. A girl who writes will tell your children fantastical stories.

Because that is the best part about a girl who writes. She has imagination and she has courage, and it will be enough. She’ll save you in the oceans of her dreams, and she’ll be your catharsis and your 11:11. She’ll be your firebird and she’ll be your knight, and she’ll become your world, in the curve of her smile, in the hazel of her eye the half-dimple on her face, the words that are pouring out of her, a torrent, a wave, a crescendo - so many sensations that you will be left breathless by a girl who writes.

Maybe she’s not the best at grammar, but that is okay.

Date a girl who writes because you deserve it. She’s witty, she’s empathetic, enigmatic at times and she’s lovely. She’s got the most colorful life. She may be living in NYC or she may be living in a small cottage. Date a girl who writes because a girl who writes reads.

A girl who writes will understand reality. She’ll be infuriating at times, and maybe sometimes you will hate her. Sometimes she will hate you too. But a girl who writes understands human nature, and she will understand that you are weak. She will not leave on the Midnight Train the first moment that things go sour. She will understand that real life isn’t like a story, because while she works in stories, she lives in reality.

Date a girl who writes.

Because there is nothing better than a girl who writes.

(Source: natalyaromanoff)

Photo 25 Dec 297,927 notes
Photo 25 Dec 218 notes ikenbot:

Leisurely use of our entertaining side of technology should be encouraged as a reward to our reading, writing, and activating our creative sides. That is, we need to discipline ourselves to make these things as normal and habitual as showering, brushing our teeth, or constantly checking who sent us a text message. If you just use it just because you have “nothing else to do and you’re bored or it’s the holidays” you’re not taking advantage of the valuable time that could be spent training and exercising your brain to help you become those things you always wanted to be. How can you have these things when you never give yourself the time, and instead crave after any distraction provided? How do we expect to progress as a global society when the greater portion of the population is slowly evolving to rely on things the brain could handle as we distract, entertain, and insult our brain’s capacity?
We have a crisis, it’s illiteracy in many forms, we have a pattern that we can use to understand why there’s so much suffering; we don’t take the necessary steps to understand key issues in life. We want these things fixed by outside sources rather than ourselves. We want to persist with the idea that we’re just here to live and die and so excessive entertainment and distractions is “not such a bad thing” as the world is slowly taken over by people who don’t know how to take care of it and its inhabitants. Without understanding.. we have nothing, we don’t know what’s going on and how to build the minds to stop whatever it is that’s going on in certain points of time. If we don’t act sooner to change our habits of destructive reliance we’ll probably end up like the people in Wall-E; Having no interest in stimulating other sides of the brain apart from the ones that are needed whenever we’re sitting down doing absolutely nothing but eating food, entertaining ourselves or receiving data the easy way.
We need some kind of a shift away from these destructive social/ personal habits and promote reading, writing, drawing, art in general with the same persistence, ease of access and determination that media giants use to get us to fall for singers, actors, products, pointless TV shows and bland movies or other heavily marketed tools and traits. It’s really about time to leave the old you behind and create someone who’s willing to always change, adapt and learn from our surroundings as we work tirelessly to make the future not so shitty and rid ourselves of the redundancy in our tech not just for ourselves but also our descendants.
I’ll be even bold enough to say, this is exactly what the planet needs right now. A heavy dose of worldwide understanding, and done so through a healthy balance of technology and our own human capabilities.
This post will self destruct on 12/27/2012

ikenbot:

Leisurely use of our entertaining side of technology should be encouraged as a reward to our reading, writing, and activating our creative sides. That is, we need to discipline ourselves to make these things as normal and habitual as showering, brushing our teeth, or constantly checking who sent us a text message. If you just use it just because you have “nothing else to do and you’re bored or it’s the holidays” you’re not taking advantage of the valuable time that could be spent training and exercising your brain to help you become those things you always wanted to be. How can you have these things when you never give yourself the time, and instead crave after any distraction provided? How do we expect to progress as a global society when the greater portion of the population is slowly evolving to rely on things the brain could handle as we distract, entertain, and insult our brain’s capacity?

We have a crisis, it’s illiteracy in many forms, we have a pattern that we can use to understand why there’s so much suffering; we don’t take the necessary steps to understand key issues in life. We want these things fixed by outside sources rather than ourselves. We want to persist with the idea that we’re just here to live and die and so excessive entertainment and distractions is “not such a bad thing” as the world is slowly taken over by people who don’t know how to take care of it and its inhabitants. Without understanding.. we have nothing, we don’t know what’s going on and how to build the minds to stop whatever it is that’s going on in certain points of time. If we don’t act sooner to change our habits of destructive reliance we’ll probably end up like the people in Wall-E; Having no interest in stimulating other sides of the brain apart from the ones that are needed whenever we’re sitting down doing absolutely nothing but eating food, entertaining ourselves or receiving data the easy way.

We need some kind of a shift away from these destructive social/ personal habits and promote reading, writing, drawing, art in general with the same persistence, ease of access and determination that media giants use to get us to fall for singers, actors, products, pointless TV shows and bland movies or other heavily marketed tools and traits. It’s really about time to leave the old you behind and create someone who’s willing to always change, adapt and learn from our surroundings as we work tirelessly to make the future not so shitty and rid ourselves of the redundancy in our tech not just for ourselves but also our descendants.

I’ll be even bold enough to say, this is exactly what the planet needs right now. A heavy dose of worldwide understanding, and done so through a healthy balance of technology and our own human capabilities.

This post will self destruct on 12/27/2012

via ken.
Photo 4 Dec 384,797 notes

(Source: pretence)

Photo 30 Nov 19,547 notes

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Video 30 Nov 805 notes

(Source: vibe-rap)

via amarelo.
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via 自由.
Quote 29 Nov 12,836 notes
To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it.
— Kurt Vonnegut (via arpeggia)

(Source: deepseahymns)


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